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    Ghana: Illegal mining destroys forests, livelihoods, and futures- urgent action needed to protect natural heritage

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    Ghana Staff Writer
    Ghana Staff Writerhttps://www.africanboulevard.com
    The African Boulevard Africain Editorial Team brings you Ghana news and breaking news headlines in Politics, Economy, Business, Investment and Entertainment. We are unbiased, moved only by the quest for truth.
    Read Time:1 Minute, 57 Second

    Accra, Ghana – (African Boulevard News) – Ghana’s lush forests are at risk due to illegal mining activities that continue to ravage the country’s natural resources. The illegal mining, known as “galamsey” in Ghana, is a significant threat to the country’s environment, biodiversity, and the livelihoods of the local communities.

    Since taking office in 2017, Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo has promised to rid the country of “galamsey.” While some progress has been made, illegal mining remains a significant challenge. According to environmentalists, illegal mining has led to the destruction of more than 60,000 hectares of forest in Ghana over the past decade.

    “Every year, Ghana loses a significant portion of its forests to illegal mining. This not only affects the environment but also the communities that depend on these forests for their livelihood,” says Kofi Annan, an environmentalist and forest conservation advocate.

    Illegal mining involves the extraction of minerals or other valuable resources from land without proper authorization. In Ghana, illegal mining is associated with the use of heavy machinery and the use of toxic chemicals like mercury, which poses a severe threat to human health and the environment.

    “The use of mercury in illegal mining has far-reaching effects on the environment that can last for decades. It causes soil and water pollution and can lead to the extinction of certain plant and animal species,” says Dr. Adu Owusu-Sekyere, an environmental scientist at the University of Ghana.

    Moreover, illegal mining activities also lead to soil degradation and the loss of fertile topsoil, which makes it difficult for farmers to grow crops and puts food security at risk. The Ghanaian government has, in recent times, intensified the fight against illegal mining with the deployment of military personnel to mining areas across the country.

    “We are committed to fighting illegal mining to protect our forests, water bodies, and the environment. We will not allow the greed of a few individuals to destroy our natural heritage,” says Ghana’s Minister of Lands and Natural Resources, Samuel Abu Jinapor.

    In conclusion, illegal mining activities continue to pose a significant threat to Ghana’s forests, biodiversity, and the livelihoods of local communities. The government’s commitment to fighting illegal mining is commendable, but more needs to be done to stop this destructive practice. It is everyone’s responsibility to protect Ghana’s natural resources for future generations.

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    Ghana Staff Writer

    The African Boulevard Africain Editorial Team brings you Ghana news and breaking news headlines in Politics, Economy, Business, Investment and Entertainment. We are unbiased, moved only by the quest for truth.
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